If I’m charged with DWI, can I get a work license, a conditional license or a hardship license?

“I have your back”

"Hiring Adam was the best decision after I was charged with 4 tickets for a DWI. It took Adam just one court appearance to convert all the tickets into a minor DWAI with minimum charges. He always made sure I was relaxed and he would take care of me like a younger brother. I've no words to thank him for what he has done for me!" *****

“Amazing lawyer”

"He is a very professional and well organized individual that will work with you not against you in any situation, and does his best to defend you and your rights in court. I would highly recommend P. Adam Militello for anyone in need of his services he provides." *****

“Mr. Militello is the BEST!”

"Adam is an AWESOME attorney! I never been in trouble with the law and after getting pulled over on the holiday was charged with a DWI. I was scared and terrified. Adam told me, I would be okay and he would fight for me. Which he did. He got my misdemeanor charge down to a traffic infraction of a DWAI. Which is a non criminal charge. I am very thankful and blessed. I'm a healthcare professional and a misdemeanor would have affected my career. He is honest, a good listener, very funny and keeps you updated in regards to your case. He contacts you in reasonable time and works hard on your case. He doesn't mind when you call asking a lot of questions. Also, he is very affordable and will work with. Forget the rest, hire best. Adam is the best." *****

If I'm charged with DWI, can I get a work license, a conditional license or a hardship license?

Many drivers charges with DWI can get some sort of conditional driving privileges, especially if you are a first time offender looking for conditional driving privileges that do not involve commercial vehicles. There are at least three different types of conditional driving privileges that a person can get during the course of a DWI prosecution.

P. Adam Militello, Esq.
P. Adam Militello, Esq.

Hardship privileges:

The first type of conditional driving privilege is called a hardship privilege. At the time a person is charged in court with DWI, if the prosecution has preliminary evidence showing that you had a BAC of 0.08 or higher, then the court is supposed to suspend your driver’s license. The court will first seize your driver's license, and upon application by your attorney, may give a hardship privilege. These applications aren't just a matter of asking for a new license. You or your attorney have to demonstrate that you have work to get to, or a medical appointment that needs to be attended, and that you can’t use public transportation. It's a little trickier to get a hardship privilege than some people might otherwise think, and it does require paperwork. An experienced DWI attorney can help get you a hardship privilege.

Pre-Conviction Conditional Licenses:

Hardship privileges are actually valid through the entire length of time that a DWI case is pending in court. However, after 30 days of your license having been suspended by the court, even if you were granted a hardship privilege, the DMV will typically send you a letter offering to give you a pre-conviction conditional license. This is the second form of conditional driving privilege that a person might be able to get during the course of a DWI prosecution. A pre-conviction conditional driver's license, if granted by the DMV, costs $75.00 as a fee to the DMV, and it allows you to drive back and forth to work, back and forth to medical appointments, back and forth to educational programming that leads to a degree. It also allows you to run errands for a few hours each week, and for that reason, it's a little more flexible than a hardship license. If you choose to go to the DMV and pay the fee, you can get a conditional license, and this license will last and be valid up until the day that you are either exonerated from your charges or convicted of your charges. 

You will not be eligible for a pre-conviction conditional license if you are facing your third DWI or DWAI offense within 25 years. You will not be eligible for a pre-conviction conditional license if you refused to take a Datamaster DMT (breathalyzer) test.

Post-Conviction Conditional Licenses:

The last type of conditional driving privilege that a person charged with DWI might possibly get is called a post-conviction conditional license. If you are a typical person with a typical license convicted of a misdemeanor DWI, you are most likely facing a six-month revocation of your driving privileges. If you enroll in the Impaired Driver Program (IDP), you become eligible for a post-conviction conditional license, which allows you to do the same type of driving that you did if you had a pre-conviction conditional license. The only difference is that it's valid after you are convicted of a DWI. Once you complete the Impaired Driver Program, you may become eligible for full driving privileges. (You will not be eligible to regain your full driving privileges after the IDP if you have had a prior DWI within the last 25 years.)

You will not be eligible for a post-conviction conditional license if this is your third DWI or DWAI offense within 25 years. You will not be eligible for a post-conviction conditional license if you refused to take a Datamaster DMT (breathalyzer) test, unless you are first convicted of an alcohol-related driving offense.

An experienced DWI attorney can help you navigate the maze of rules surrounding driving privileges, and can increase your chances of getting a conditional driving privilege. For more information about the best ways to deal with DWI charges, contact The Militello Law Firm for a free telephone consultation and case evaluation. Our phone number is (585) 485-0025.

 

The Militello Law Firm
2480 Browncroft Boulevard
Rochester, New York 14625
Phone: (585) 485-0025 Fax: (585) 286-3128